Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-06T16:25:54Z
dc.date.available2014-06-06T16:25:54Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13924
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: For a thousand years, China was a bureaucratic meritocracy. Men from any walk of life could become high ranking officials if they did well on the Imperial examination. Failure meant dishonor, disgrace and poverty. In modern China, the Imperial exam has morphed into The National Examination for College Entrance. So much is at stake that cheating is rampant. Students buy answers, fake results and pay proxy test takers. Recently, an official was arrested for stealing the superior exam results of a village girl and passing them off as his daughter's. The scandal has become a hot topic on China's websites where bloggers are giving the official black marks for the injustice. One might say that, for this bureaucrat at least, it's become a blogocratic demeritocracy. #ceas #china #hacker
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0157
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/833514-0157-blogocratic-demeritocacy
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectBureaucratic Meritocracy
dc.subjectMeritocracy
dc.subjectImperial Exam
dc.subjectNational Examination For College Entrance
dc.subjectCheating
dc.subjectBlog
dc.titleBlogocratic Demeritocacy
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.kudepartmentCenter for East Asian Studies
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Audio

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record