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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.contributor.authorTsutsui, William
dc.contributor.authorAshworth, William
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-03T19:55:06Z
dc.date.available2014-06-03T19:55:06Z
dc.date.issued2007-10-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13841
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: So what's Japan's greatest contribution to world food culture? Instant ramen? Sushi? Well, what about MSG, monosodium glutamate, the flavor-enhancing seasoning often associated with Chinese restaurants, though today used in processed foods and fast food franchises the world over. MSG was discovered in 1907 by Ikeda Kikunae who was trying to pin down just what makes Japanese seaweed seem so yummy. Ikeda found that humans don't just recognize four basic tastes--sweet, sour, bitter, and salty--but also a fifth, which he called umami and which gets turned on with a buzz by monosodium glutamate. So when you enjoy some KFC, remember that the secret might just be MSG. #ashworth #ceas #japan #tsutsui
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0098
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/828833-0098-the-secret-is-msg
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectMsg
dc.subjectMonosodium Glutamate
dc.subjectUmami
dc.subjectIkeda, Kikunae
dc.titleThe Secret is MSG
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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