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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.contributor.authorTsutsui, William
dc.contributor.authorDevine, Maija
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-28T20:00:36Z
dc.date.available2014-05-28T20:00:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-01-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13788
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: Repeat after me: doo-yoo kah-peh rah-teh seh-gop . Roughly translated, that means "triple soy latte" in Korean. Why do you need to know this? Because, in a modern-day David and Goliath story, Starbucks has lost a lawsuit to Starpreya, South Korea's coffee franchise. Even though Starpreya's logo features a woman's face in the center of a green circle, uppercase letters and two stars, South Korean lawyers argued successfully that the choice of name and logo is NOT an infringement of Starbucks' copyright. Thus far, the South Korean patent court is the only one to find in favor of the independent underdog; Starbucks won similar suits in China and Japan. So, would you like that doo-yoo kah-peh rah-teh seh-gop with or without sugar? #ceas #devine #schneiderwind #SouthKorea #tsutsui
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0060
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/825460-0060-fake-starbucks
dc.subjectSouth Korea
dc.subjectStarbucks
dc.subjectStarpreya
dc.titleFake Starbucks
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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