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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.contributor.authorTsutsui, William
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-28T16:24:34Z
dc.date.available2014-05-28T16:24:34Z
dc.date.issued2006-08-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13768
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: The Japanese have taken small numbers of whales from their coastal waters for centuries, but Japan only began deep-sea whaling in the 1930s, selling the whale oil to soap makers in Europe and using the profits to fund imperial expansion. During World War II, Japanese whaling came to an end, as the nation's whaling fleet was sunk by Allied bombs and torpedoes. After the war, Japanese whaling looked all washed up, but unexpectedly strong support from Douglas MacArthur's occupation forces revived the industry. American planners figured that whale meat was a plentiful, inexpensive source of protein for the hungry Japanese masses. Thus, the U.S. provided the capital, equipment, and technical assistance to get Japan's whalers back on the high seas. So, the next time you say "Save the Whales," you might also ask "From whom?" #ceas #japan #tsutsui
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0043
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/825357-0043-whale-blame
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectWhaling
dc.subjectWorld War Ii
dc.subjectDouglas Macarthur
dc.titleWhale Blame
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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