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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.contributor.authorTsutsui, William
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T18:13:39Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T18:13:39Z
dc.date.issued2005-12-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13713
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: As China's economy booms, its demand for energy grows. With oil prices up and coal-fired power plants choking Chinese cities and people, the government is aggressively developing renewable energy sources, particularly wind power. Wind farms are sprouting all across China, but especially on the grassy, breezy plains of Inner Mongolia. There are even schemes to plant wind farms in the oceans, just off China's crowded coasts, where the wind is steady and the real estate not yet occupied. According to the New York Times, China expects to generate a fifth of its energy needs from alternative sources by 2020. So, over the coming decades, the future of China's economic development might just be blowing in the wind. #ceas #china #hacker #tsutsui
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0009
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/778778-0009-renewable-mongolia
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectInner Mongolia
dc.subjectRenewable Resources
dc.subjectMongolia
dc.subjectWind Power
dc.titleRenewable Mongolia
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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