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dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, David C.
dc.contributor.authorBickford, David P.
dc.contributor.authorDiesmos, Arvin C.
dc.contributor.authorIskandar, Djoko T
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Rafe M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-17T20:13:02Z
dc.date.available2014-03-17T20:13:02Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-09
dc.identifier.citationBlackburn DC, Bickford DP, Diesmos AC, Iskandar DT, Brown RM (2010) An Ancient Origin for the Enigmatic Flat-Headed Frogs (Bombinatoridae: Barbourula) from the Islands of Southeast Asia. PLoS ONE 5(8): e12090. http://dx.doi.org10.1371/journal.pone.0012090
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13182
dc.description.abstractBackground

The complex history of Southeast Asian islands has long been of interest to biogeographers. Dispersal and vicariance events in the Pleistocene have received the most attention, though recent studies suggest a potentially more ancient history to components of the terrestrial fauna. Among this fauna is the enigmatic archaeobatrachian frog genus Barbourula, which only occurs on the islands of Borneo and Palawan. We utilize this lineage to gain unique insight into the temporal history of lineage diversification in Southeast Asian islands.

Methodology/Principal Findings

Using mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data, multiple fossil calibration points, and likelihood and Bayesian methods, we estimate phylogenetic relationships and divergence times for Barbourula. We determine the sensitivity of focal divergence times to specific calibration points by jackknife approach in which each calibration point is excluded from analysis. We find that relevant divergence time estimates are robust to the exclusion of specific calibration points. Barbourula is recovered as a monophyletic lineage nested within a monophyletic Costata. Barbourula diverged from its sister taxon Bombina in the Paleogene and the two species of Barbourula diverged in the Late Miocene.

Conclusions/Significance

The divergences within Barbourula and between it and Bombina are surprisingly old and represent the oldest estimates for a cladogenetic event resulting in living taxa endemic to Southeast Asian islands. Moreover, these divergence time estimates are consistent with a new biogeographic scenario: the Palawan Ark Hypothesis. We suggest that components of Palawan's terrestrial fauna might have “rafted” on emergent portions of the North Palawan Block during its migration from the Asian mainland to its present-day position near Borneo. Further, dispersal from Palawan to Borneo (rather than Borneo to Palawan) may explain the current day disjunct distribution of this ancient lineage.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from the United States National Science Foundation (http://www.nsf.gov; DEB-0640737 and 0743491 to RMB) and the National University of Singapore (http://www.nus.edu.sg; R-154-000-383-133) to DPB.
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2010 Blackburn et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBiogeography
dc.subjectFossil calibration
dc.subjectFrogs
dc.subjectHistorical archaeology
dc.subjectPaleogenetics
dc.subjectPhyolgenetic analysis
dc.subjectPhylogeography
dc.subjectPleistocene epoch
dc.titleAn Ancient Origin for the Enigmatic Flat-Headed Frogs (Bombinatoridae: Barbourula) from the Islands of Southeast Asia
dc.typeArticle
kusw.kuauthorBackburn, David C.
kusw.kuauthorBrown, Rafe M.
kusw.kudepartmentBiodiversity Institute
kusw.kudepartmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
kusw.oastatusfullparticipation
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0012090
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1810-9886
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher version
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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© 2010 Blackburn et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2010 Blackburn et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.