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dc.contributor.advisorFarmer, Frank
dc.contributor.authorDance, Daryl Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-05T17:07:43Z
dc.date.available2014-02-05T17:07:43Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-31
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:13109
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13006
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT In 1974, the Conference on College Composition and Communication passed "Students' Right to Their Own Language" (SRTOL), a statement which encouraged teachers of English to "have the experiences and training that will enable them" to value the dialects and cultures that their students bring into the classroom. Since the passage of this document, critics have debated if, how and why SRTOL can be implemented in the classroom. This dissertation seeks to expand the understanding of "Students Right to Their Own Language" by examining how the document speaks on behalf of teachers and students and the implications of doing so. I argue that by understanding how the CCCC speaks on behalf of others, we can better understand the sociopolitical implications of speaking on behalf of others.
dc.format.extent283 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectSpeaking for others
dc.subjectSpeaking on behalf of others
dc.subjectStudents' right to their own language
dc.titleSpeaking on Behalf of Others: Understanding "Students' Right to Their Own Language" Through an Alternate Frame
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberDevitt, Amy
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineEnglish
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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