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dc.contributor.advisorAtchley, Ruth Ann
dc.contributor.authorYen, Yana
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-29T15:01:09Z
dc.date.available2013-09-29T15:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2013-08-31
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:13000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/12212
dc.description.abstractDefensiveness affects people negatively in terms of their psychological and physical well-being. Curbing one's defensive response is especially difficult when the individual does not acknowledge how their cognition and physiology change when they respond defensively. Authentic disposition involves a flexible self-concept, which facilitates cognitive and physiological self-regulation in difficult situations. In the current study, participants answered personally threatening questions while their physiological state was measured. Galvanic skin response and heart rate were used to examine arousal and respiratory sinus arrhythmia was calculated to examine the degree of emotional regulation. Authenticity, assessed by self-report, was used to predict to what degree participants were aroused by the stress of revealing sensitive information about the self, and how well they were able to regulate their emotional state. Results of the study showed that defensive verbal response predicted higher physiological arousal measured in terms of changes in skin conductance and heart rate throughout the four stages of experiment, and behavioral authenticity predicted lower physiological response during the four stages. Meanwhile, high authenticity predicted better recovery after the interview. These findings indicate that while defensive verbal response results in increased arousal during a sensitive conversation, authentic disposition may act as a buffer for the negative effects of such arousal.
dc.format.extent54 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectAuthenticity
dc.subjectDefensiveness
dc.subjectGalvanic skin response
dc.subjectHeart rate
dc.subjectStress
dc.titleAuthenticity and Physiological Changes during Defensive Verbal Response
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberAtchley, Paul
dc.contributor.cmtememberHamilton, Nancy
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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