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dc.contributor.advisorPressman, Sarah D.
dc.contributor.authorBowlin, Stephanie Lynne
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-17T20:58:09Z
dc.date.available2013-02-17T20:58:09Z
dc.date.issued2012-12-31
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:12469
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/10872
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relations between dispositional levels of trait mindfulness and self-compassion and two physiological stress markers during a lab stress task: Oxytocin (OT) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) (an indicator of parasympathetic nervous system functioning). Although there is some literature to suggest that induced state mindfulness alters physiological functioning, there is a paucity of research examining trait levels in association with physiological outcomes. Trait levels may be important to well-being given the practice of being more mindful and self-compassionate is not merely an exercise, but lifestyle characteristics of being aware of and accepting of the present moment. Furthermore, while self-compassion and mindfulness are clinically discussed and taught together, they are rarely studied together empirically to determine their relative impacts on wellness outcomes. To fill these gaps, data were collected from 68 college-age students, who after completing one of two stress studies in the lab, were contacted to complete measures for trait mindfulness and self-compassion. Linear regressions, controlling for appropriate controls, found that trait self-compassion was significantly associated with less OT during stress. Additionally, trait mindfulness was marginally related to OT during recovery from stress. In particular, those high in trait mindfulness had a steeper decline in OT levels after stress. Effects remained the same for self-compassion even when conceptually related personality traits were controlled for, but mindfulness was no longer marginally related to OT recovery when neuroticism was controlled for. No significant results were found for RSA. Results suggest that self-compassion may be more beneficial during stress while mindfulness may be most effective during recovery. Implications regarding the relationship between mindfulness and self-compassion and future research directions are discussed.
dc.format.extent68 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectClinical psychology
dc.subjectHeart rate variability
dc.subjectMindfulness
dc.subjectOxytocin
dc.subjectSelf-compassion
dc.subjectStress response
dc.titleDispositional Mindfulness and Self-Compassion and their influence on Oxytocin and Parasympathetic Functioning
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberGillath, Omri
dc.contributor.cmtememberJohnson, David
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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