Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRapoff, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorHutcheson, Tresza Denae
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-17T16:39:01Z
dc.date.available2013-02-17T16:39:01Z
dc.date.issued2012-12-31
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:12535
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/10817
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of fruits and vegetables (FV) include supplying nutrients and fiber to the diet, reducing risk of disease, and assisting in weight maintenance by increasing satiety and decreasing energy density of the diet. FV intake has been inadequate compared to national recommendations across the population and interventions to increase FV intake in pediatric populations have shown mixed results. This study utilized mobile health technology (mHealth, handheld computers) to deliver an Ecological Momentary Intervention (EMI) incorporating behavior change skills (e.g., goal setting, self-monitoring, problem-solving, feedback, and reward) called Growing up Strong (GuS) to increase FV consumption in low-income, ethnic minority children and adolescent girls. Compared to a paper manual control condition, participants randomized to GuS significantly increased their fruit and combined FV, but not vegetable intake from Baseline to end of intervention (Week 4). Follow-up at Week 12 showed that all treatment gains had been lost. Adherence to the electronic program was high, with participants interacting with the program on 81.1% of days and answering 50.4% of the 6 daily program prompts over the 28 days of the intervention. Results indicate an EMI is acceptable to female youth and can help boost FV intake. Creating fun FV intervention programs that can sustain interest for longevity of use might have a greater impact by preventing immediate return to previous intake levels and reinforcing longer-term lifestyle change. Recommendations are provided for integrating FV intervention into larger multiple health behavior change (MHBC) programs to increase impact on weight management and health outcomes.
dc.format.extent102 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectChildren and adolescents
dc.subjectE-health
dc.subjectFruit
dc.subjectVegetable
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectWeight management
dc.subjectWeight prevention
dc.titleUsing mobile technology to impact fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income youth
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberDenney, Doug
dc.contributor.cmtememberHamilton, Nancy
dc.contributor.cmtememberHiggins, Raymond L.
dc.contributor.cmtememberNollen, Nicole L
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record