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dc.contributor.advisorDuerksen, George
dc.contributor.authorHamersky, Dianne
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-20T19:15:12Z
dc.date.available2012-12-20T19:15:12Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/10508
dc.descriptionThesis (M.M. Ed.)--University of Kansas, Art and Music Education and Music Therapy, 1992.
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the motivational reasons students stay in band. A number of studies address why students drop out of band. Many have found a "lack of interest" among dropouts. Few, however, gathered data on student's motivational factors and their reasons for staying in band. The research questions for this study were: (1) What extrinsic and intrinsic forces help keep the student in band, (2) What areas of band are the most interesting, from the student's perspective, (3) What are the continuing student's general perceptions and feelings toward music, learning, the teacher, and the class, (4) How was the instrument chosen and how does this affect why the student continues to enroll in band, (5) What are the student's perceived sense of worth, individual progress, and capabilities in the music class, (6) How well does the student honestly and objectively expect to do in music, and (7) To what does the student attribute his success. A pilot study of the questionnaire insured that the survey questions and instructions were easily comprehensible. The pilot study involved several high school flute students of this writer. These students completed the questionnaire and offered suggestions and improvements. Main study subjects were high school Midwestern Music Camp participants. Before camp began students and parents read and completed consent forms asking for their signatures to participate in this study. At the dormitory during a floor meeting, the students completed the questionnaire. Subjects did not include their names on the questionnaires; code marks identified individuals for subsequent interviews. Students provided information about themselves and their family on the questionnaire and in the subsequent interview. All information gathered from the subjects was reported with anonymity. The subsequent interview gave an indepth follow-up based on lack of responses on the questionnaire. Through descriptive analysis involving measures of relationships, the results showed significant relationships between chair in band, importance of learning about music, relationship to the director, and staying in band through high school and into college. Grade level was found to be significantly related to enjoying the music played in band, needing credits for graduation, and band as an easy class. There was a significant relationship between taking private lessons and the student's love of music, between chair in band and the importance of travel for staying in band, and the amount of practice and learning about music. There were significant differences on ratings of band being an easy class and how the students chose their instruments, but not on the student's continued enrollment in band. The student's self worth increased with age, but not with practicing, a musical family, grade point average, or chair in band. The students mainly attribute their success to their family, band director, and private teacher. The higher the student is in their section and the more they practice the more likely the student plans to enroll in band in college.
dc.format.extent103 pages
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectMusic education
dc.subjectBand
dc.subjectParticipation
dc.titleMotivational Factors Contributing to Continued Participation in High School Band Programs
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberHarrington, Robert G.
dc.contributor.cmtememberRadocy, Rudolf
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineArt and Music Education and Music Therapy
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.M.E.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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