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dc.contributor.advisorKelly, John
dc.contributor.authorBodbyl-Roels, Sarah Ann
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-28T16:09:55Z
dc.date.available2012-10-28T16:09:55Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-31
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:12281
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/10283
dc.description.abstractThe evolution and maintenance of plant mating systems has been a topic of great interest throughout the history of evolutionary biology. Despite a large body of literature describing mating system variation, critical knowledge is lacking regarding the mechanisms involved in mating system transitions, including the rate and magnitude of trait changes. I combine experimental evolution, pollinator behavioral studies, and classic phytomorphology to examine the mating system transition from outcrossing to self-fertilizing (selfing) in flowering plants. Using the wildflower Mimulus guttatus (yellow monkeyflower) as a model, I investigate which traits facilitate outcrossing via mutualistic relationships with pollinators and which traits evolve in response to pollination disruption. In Chapters 1 and 2, I demonstrate that rapid evolution of adaptive floral and genetic traits can occur in populations that lose pollinators and that trait evolution occurs sequentially. In Chapter 3, I find strong pollinator preference for specific floral traits, evidence that pollinator selection maintains attractive traits in wild populations. However, pollinators displayed limited ability to distinguish between subtle population variants and thus are unlikely drivers of ethological speciation. In Chapter 4, I document within and among population variation in a cryptic floral trait, ultraviolet (UV) patterning. UV patterning is a visual stimulant for pollinators, but I found it in a selfing Mimulus species, suggesting that UV patterning in flowers functions beyond pollinator attraction. My research has direct implications for forecasting plant adaptation as anthropogenic environmental disturbance increasingly decouples plant-pollinator relationships. Rapid adaptation is an option for some self-compatible, pollinator-reliant plants; however, a transition to selfing results in decreased genetic diversity which may expose populations to extinction with further environmental disturbances.
dc.format.extent196 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectEvolution & development
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectBumblebee behavior
dc.subjectEvolutionary rescue
dc.subjectExperimental evolution
dc.subjectFloral ultraviolet patterns
dc.subjectMimulus
dc.subjectPlant-insect interactions
dc.titleMATING SYSTEM EVOLUTION, PLANT-POLLINATOR INTERACTIONS, AND FLORAL ULTRAVIOLET PATTERNING IN MIMULUS GUTTATUS
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberAlexander, Helen
dc.contributor.cmtememberFoster, Bryan
dc.contributor.cmtememberCrawford, Daniel
dc.contributor.cmtememberKerr, Barbara
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7590-677X
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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