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dc.contributor.advisorO'Brien, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorHale, Jason William
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-28T15:38:14Z
dc.date.available2012-10-28T15:38:14Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-31
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:12336
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/10272
dc.description.abstractFor the last forty years, the federal government and tribal governments have developed and administered programs to lower the obesity and diabetes rates among American Indian populations. Despite these joint efforts, a diabetes epidemic continues to ravage Indian country with rates ranging from 16% to 40% to 70%, depending upon the community, while rates for non-Indians are approximately 8%. This thesis argues that one of the reasons that existing programs have failed to lower diabetes rates is due to their failure to address an unresolved grief labeled historical trauma and socio-political factors that may be even more fundamental to diabetes causation among American Indians. Poverty, suicide, alcohol and drug abuse, microaggressions, violence and traumatic events, exacerbated by historical trauma, contribute to a heightened level of stress among American Indians that is unparalleled. Given that research has linked stress and trauma to the onset of diabetes, exposure to these risk factors for American Indians is an overlooked factor. Health behaviors and trajectories set for a lifetime during adolescence make this an extremely vulnerable period of life for American Indians. The thesis suggests American Indian diabetes prevention programs that target adolescents, explore the impact of colonization and continued oppression of American Indian people on the deterioration of their health, and continue to promote the benefits of healthy diets and exercise may help to slow the prevalence of obesity and diabetes in these communities.
dc.format.extent138 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectNative American studies
dc.subjectAmerican Indian
dc.subjectDiabetes
dc.subjectDiabetes prevention
dc.subjectHistorical trauma
dc.titleThe Importance of Historical Trauma & Stress as a Factor in Diabetes and Obesity Prevention among American Indian Adolescents
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberFitzgerald, Stephanie
dc.contributor.cmtememberKindscher, Kelly
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineGlobal Indigenous Nations Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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