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dc.contributor.authorAslan, Clare E.
dc.contributor.authorSikes, Benjamin A.
dc.contributor.authorGedan, Keryn B.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-29T20:33:27Z
dc.date.available2015-10-29T20:33:27Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-23
dc.identifier.citationAslan CE, Sikes BA, Gedan KB (2015) Research on mutualisms between native and non-native partners can contribute critical ecological insights. NeoBiota 26: 39-54. doi: 10.3897/neobiota.26.8837en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/18754
dc.description.abstractMutualisms are important structuring forces in ecological communities, influencing ecosystem functions, diversity, and evolutionary trajectories. New interactions, particularly between native and non-native species, are globally increasing in biotic communities as species introductions accelerate. Positive interactions such as novel mutualisms can affect the fitness of organisms in invaded communities. Non-natives can augment native mutualism networks, replace extinct native partners, or disrupt native mutualisms. Because they are actively forming or newly formed, novel mutualisms offer a unique opportunity to examine in real time the factors governing early mutualism formation and stability, including frequency-dependent processes and those relying on specific traits or functions. These central ecological questions have been inferred from long-formed mutualisms, but novel mutualisms may allow a glimpse of successes and failures in ecological time with insights into the relative importance of these factors as ecological systems shift. To this end, this commentary addresses how novel mutualisms inform our understanding of mutualism formation, stability, the importance of functional traits, and niche vs. neutral processes, using examples across multiple systems. Novel mutualism research thus far has been largely limited in both questions and ecosystems, but if more broadly applied could benefit both theoretical and applied ecology.en_US
dc.publisherPensoft Publishersen_US
dc.rights© 2015 Clare E. Aslan, Benjamin A. Sikes, Keryn B. Gedan. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPositive interactionsen_US
dc.subjectMarineen_US
dc.subjectBelowgrounden_US
dc.subjectBiological invasionsen_US
dc.subjectnon-native speciesen_US
dc.subjectNovel mutualismsen_US
dc.titleResearch on mutualisms between native and non-native partners can contribute critical ecological insightsen_US
dc.typeArticle
kusw.kuauthorSikes, Benjamin A.
kusw.kudepartmentEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3897/neobiota.26.8837
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher version
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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© 2015 Clare E. Aslan, Benjamin A. Sikes, Keryn B. Gedan. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2015 Clare E. Aslan, Benjamin A. Sikes, Keryn B. Gedan. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.