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dc.contributor.advisorStansifer, Charles L.
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Sterling
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-02T16:03:06Z
dc.date.available2011-08-02T16:03:06Z
dc.date.issued1997-07-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/7857
dc.descriptionThe University of Kansas has long historical connections with Central America and the many Central Americans who have earned graduate degrees at KU. This work is part of the Central American Theses and Dissertations collection in KU ScholarWorks and is being made freely available with permission of the author through the efforts of Professor Emeritus Charles Stansifer of the History department and the staff of the Scholarly Communications program at the University of Kansas Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship.
dc.description.abstractCosta Rica is often cited as a "model" for environmental conservation. This dissertation seeks to track the history of conservation efforts in Costa Rica via analysis of the development of its national parks and other protected areas. The focus of the work will be on discussing how Costa Rica came to establish its conservation system which today includes over twenty-five percent of the country's terrain. It will describe the system, discuss key leaders involved, and analyze conservation in light of what it was in response to: rapid destruction of tropical ecosystems due to the expansion of exportrelated agricultural commodities. How and why were national parks and biological reserves proposed and designated? Who has been behind them? Why and how did these individuals become involved in their country's conservation movement? What has been the overall impact of conservation on the nation's environmental well being, economy, and education? What challenges have conservationists had to confront; what goals and dilemmas await them? Importantly, the work will address what Costa Ricans have said and are saying about these conservation concerns. Emphasis will be placed on policy reactions—laws and decrees and how they came about. To limit the scope of this project, "conservation" here will imply the creation of national parks, biological reserves, national wildlife refuges, and indigenous reserves that have been set aside for long-range preservation for future generations. While there have been many works written about Costa Rica's national parks, what is missing is a historical work that links development of conservation patterns with agricultural and political history. The intent of this dissertation is to show how conservation policy came about, how leaders in the movement worked to forge changes, and how conservation thought has evolved from the early days of Costa Rican independence to 1996.
dc.format.extent327
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.titleThe Green Republic: A Conservation History of Costa Rica, 1838-1996
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberWorster, Donald
dc.contributor.cmtememberKuznesof, Elizabeth
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineHistory
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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