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dc.contributor.advisorMetz, Brent
dc.contributor.authorBonkiewicz, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-01T20:50:24Z
dc.date.available2011-08-01T20:50:24Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/7813
dc.descriptionThe University of Kansas has long historical connections with Central America and the many Central Americans who have earned graduate degrees at KU. This work is part of the Central American Theses and Dissertations collection in KU ScholarWorks and is being made freely available with permission of the author through the efforts of Professor Emeritus Charles Stansifer of the History department and the staff of the Scholarly Communications program at the University of Kansas Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship.
dc.description.abstractCosta Rica has experienced large migrations from Nicaragua in the past two decades due primarily to Nicaragua’s weak economy and volatile government. Costa Rica offers immigrants a stable economy and political situation. One consequence of these migrations is strong negative perceptions held by Costa Ricans about Nicaraguans. How and from where did the negative perceptions originate? What feeds and encourages these negative perceptions? Why do negative perceptions continue to persist? In order to answer these questions and assess the validity of the negative perceptions, this thesis analyzes essays written by seventh-graders regarding their opinions of Nicaraguans in Costa Rica. The overall student response was negative, which matches the discourse used by the adult population. In some instances, there was reasonable, objective evidence for the validity of the negative perceptions. However, in most cases, the students tended to over-generalize and exaggerate negative perceptions in response to their fear of the “other.”
dc.format.extent139
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.titleSeventh Grade Students' Perceptions of Nicaraguan Immigrants in Costa Rica
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberStansifer, Charles
dc.contributor.cmtememberBayard De Volo, Lorraine M.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineLatin American Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
kusw.bibid5348920
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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