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dc.contributor.authorMeehan, Teresa
dc.date.accessioned2005-05-24T21:37:09Z
dc.date.available2005-05-24T21:37:09Z
dc.date.issued1991-01-01
dc.identifier.issn1043-3805
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/423
dc.description.abstractIn standard American English, the word like has several senses associated with it, the earliest of which dates back to the 14th century according to the OED. Some of these senses, however, reflect more recent developments in the language and suggest that the lexical aspects of the word are changing in the direction toward a more grammatical function. This paper presents a historical analysis of the use of the word like and posits a possible grammaticalization path in an attempt to explain the current usage of like in modern-day English.
dc.format.extent1818378 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas. Lingusitics Graduate Student Association
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKansas Working Papers in Linguistics;
dc.rightsThis work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectEnglish language-- Idioms
dc.subjectLike (English Word)
dc.titleIt's Like, 'What's Happening in the Evolution of Like?': A Theory of Grammaticalization
dc.typeWorking Paper
kusw.oastatusna
dc.identifier.doi10.17161/KWPL.1808.423
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.  For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.