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dc.contributor.advisorCrawford, Michael H
dc.contributor.authorRubicz, Rohina C.
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-05T04:48:35Z
dc.date.available2008-08-05T04:48:35Z
dc.date.issued2007-09-24
dc.date.submitted2007
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:2222
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/4055
dc.description.abstractThis study uses molecular genetic markers to investigate the genetic consequences of the founding and other historic events on the Aleut gene pool. Maternal markers (mtDNA RFLPs and sequencing), paternal markers (Y chromosome SNPs and STRs), and biparentally-inherited markers (autosomal STRs, and classic genetic markers from the literature) are characterized to address the questions: 1) is there reduced genetic diversity in recently founded Aleut communities compared to the parental Aleutian Aleut population? 2) How reproductively isolated are these communities? 3) Is there symmetry in maternal versus paternal gene flow? 4) What is the genetic effect of the interaction genetic drift and gene flow? 5) Which of the three aggregates differentiates most from the parental population? Maternal markers for all Aleut populations belong to Native American mtDNA haplogroups A and D, indicating there was no non-Native female gene flow into the population, for individuals claiming Aleut maternal ancestry. In contrast, the majority of paternal markers (73% to 90%) are of non-Aleut origin, due to gene flow from Russians and other non-Aleut males. The Bering community exhibits considerably reduced mtDNA diversity, demonstrated by the fixation of haplogroup D, and gene diversity=0.29, compared to other Aleuts (St. George=0.56, St. Paul=0.72, and Aleutian Aleuts=0.77). This is likely the result of Bering experiencing a founder effect, followed by its closure from other Aleut populations after the U.S. purchase of Alaska in 1867. Meanwhile, the Pribilof communities remained in contact with the Aleutian inhabitants. The low gene diversity, however, is not demonstrated by the paternal markers for the communities (Bering=1.0, St. Paul=0.9591, St. George=0.9167, and Aleutian Aleuts=0.9565), or the autosomal markers (Bering Aleuts= 0.776, and Bering mixed Aleuts=0.882). The results indicate genetic drift may be acting on the maternal lineages, while the opposing evolutionary force of gene flow is affecting the paternal markers. Autosomal markers are intermediate, falling within the rage of other Native American and Siberian populations. This study demonstrates that due to unique historic events, the Bering community has differentiated most from the parental Aleut population, but that St. Paul and St. George have also experienced evolutionary genetic change due to their founding.
dc.format.extent178 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPhysical anthropology
dc.titleEvolutionary Consequences of Recently Founded Aleut Communities in the Commander and Pribilof Islands
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberMielke, James
dc.contributor.cmtememberHofman, Jack
dc.contributor.cmtememberBenedict, Steve
dc.contributor.cmtememberRedd, Alan
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineAnthropology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPH.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
kusw.bibid6599208
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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