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dc.contributor.authorMcKinney, Walker S.
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Shannon E.
dc.contributor.authorUnruh, Kathryn E.
dc.contributor.authorShafer, Robin L.
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, John A.
dc.contributor.authorStyner, Martin
dc.contributor.authorMosconi, Matthew W.
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-08T19:05:14Z
dc.date.available2022-07-08T19:05:14Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-03
dc.identifier.citationMcKinney WS, Kelly SE, Unruh KE, Shafer RL, Sweeney JA, Styner M, Mosconi MW. Cerebellar Volumes and Sensorimotor Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Front Integr Neurosci. 2022 May 3;16:821109. doi: 10.3389/fnint.2022.821109. PMID: 35592866; PMCID: PMC9113114.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/32808
dc.description.abstractBackground: Sensorimotor issues are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), though their neural bases are not well understood. The cerebellum is vital to sensorimotor control and reduced cerebellar volumes in ASD have been documented. Our study examined the extent to which cerebellar volumes are associated with multiple sensorimotor behaviors in ASD.

Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight participants with ASD and 34 typically developing (TD) controls (8–30 years) completed a structural MRI scan and precision grip testing, oculomotor testing, or both. Force variability during precision gripping as well as absolute error and trial-to-trial error variability of visually guided saccades were examined. Volumes of cerebellar lobules, vermis, and white matter were quantified. The relationships between each cerebellar region of interest (ROI) and force variability, saccade error, and saccade error variability were examined.

Results: Relative to TD controls, individuals with ASD showed increased force variability. Individuals with ASD showed a reduced volume of cerebellar vermis VI-VII relative to TD controls. Relative to TD females, females with ASD showed a reduced volume of bilateral cerebellar Crus II/lobule VIIB. Increased volume of Crus I was associated with increased force variability. Increased volume of vermal lobules VI-VII was associated with reduced saccade error for TD controls but not individuals with ASD. Increased right lobule VIII and cerebellar white matter volumes as well as reduced right lobule VI and right lobule X volumes were associated with greater ASD symptom severity. Reduced volumes of right Crus II/lobule VIIB were associated with greater ASD symptom severity in only males, while reduced volumes of right Crus I were associated with more severe restricted and repetitive behaviors only in females.

Conclusion: Our finding that increased force variability in ASD is associated with greater cerebellar Crus I volumes indicates that disruption of sensory feedback processing supported by Crus I may contribute to skeletomotor differences in ASD. Results showing that volumes of vermal lobules VI-VII are associated with saccade precision in TD but not ASD implicates atypical organization of the brain systems supporting oculomotor control in ASD. Associations between volumes of cerebellar subregions and ASD symptom severity suggest cerebellar pathological processes may contribute to multiple developmental challenges in ASD.
en_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.rights© 2022 McKinney, Kelly, Unruh, Shafer, Sweeney, Styner and Mosconi. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectCerebellumen_US
dc.subjectVolumetryen_US
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorder (ASD)en_US
dc.subjectSensorimotoren_US
dc.subjectOculomotoren_US
dc.subjectMRIen_US
dc.subjectStructureen_US
dc.subjectCrus Ien_US
dc.titleCerebellar Volumes and Sensorimotor Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorMcKinney, Walker S.
kusw.kuauthorKelly, Shannon E.
kusw.kuauthorUnruh, Kathryn E.
kusw.kuauthorShafer, Robin L.
kusw.kuauthorMosconi, Matthew W.
kusw.kudepartmentSchiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studiesen_US
kusw.kudepartmentKansas Center for Autism Research and Training (K-CART)en_US
kusw.kudepartmentClinical Child Psychology Programen_US
kusw.kudepartmentPsychologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnint.2022.821109en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid35592866en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 2022 McKinney, Kelly, Unruh, Shafer, Sweeney, Styner and Mosconi. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2022 McKinney, Kelly, Unruh, Shafer, Sweeney, Styner and Mosconi. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).