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dc.contributor.authorAbbasi, Saqib
dc.contributor.authorRoller, John
dc.contributor.authorAbdallah, Al-Ola
dc.contributor.authorShune, Leyla
dc.contributor.authorMcClune, Brian
dc.contributor.authorSborov, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorMohyuddin, Ghulam Rehman
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-21T14:37:04Z
dc.date.available2022-03-21T14:37:04Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-31
dc.identifier.citationAbbasi, S., Roller, J., Abdallah, AO. et al. Hospitalization at the end of life in patients with multiple myeloma. BMC Cancer 21, 339 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-021-08079-xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/32641
dc.descriptionA grant from the One-University Open Access Fund at the University of Kansas was used to defray the author's publication fees in this Open Access journal. The Open Access Fund, administered by librarians from the KU, KU Law, and KUMC libraries, is made possible by contributions from the offices of KU Provost, KU Vice Chancellor for Research & Graduate Studies, and KUMC Vice Chancellor for Research. For more information about the Open Access Fund, please see http://library.kumc.edu/authors-fund.xml.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Despite advances in treatment, multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable and results in significant morbidity and mortality. Further research investigating where MM patients die and characterization of end-of-life hospitalizations is needed.

Methods We utilized the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) to explore the hospitalization burden of MM patients at the end of their lives.

Results The percent of patients dying in the hospital as a percent of overall MM deaths ranged from 54% in 2002 to 41.4% in 2017 (p < 0.01). Blood transfusions were received in 32.7% of these hospitalizations and infections were present in 47.8% of patients. Palliative care and/or hospice consultations ranged from 5.3% in 2002 to 31.4% in 2017 (p < 0.01).

Conclusion Our study demonstrates that patients with MM dying in the hospital have a significant requirement for blood transfusions and have a high infection burden. We also show that palliative care and hospice involvement at the end of life has increased over time but remains low, and that ultimately, inpatient mortality has decreased over time, but MM patients die in the hospital at a higher rate than the general population.
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dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2021 Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectMultiple myelomaen_US
dc.subjectPalliative careen_US
dc.subjectHospiceen_US
dc.subjectDeathen_US
dc.subjectNational inpatient sampleen_US
dc.subjectInpatienten_US
dc.subjectHospitalen_US
dc.titleHospitalization at the end of life in patients with multiple myelomaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12885-021-08079-xen_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© The Author(s). 2021 Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © The Author(s). 2021 Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.