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dc.contributor.advisorJanzen, John M
dc.contributor.authorGhazali, Marwa Hamed
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-07T21:19:10Z
dc.date.available2018-06-07T21:19:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-31
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:15545
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/26480
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a phenomenological study of sickness and social suffering among cemetery squatters living and dying with clusters of incurable affliction (marad) including hypertension (al-daght), Type 2 diabetes mellitus (al-sukkar), and cardiovascular disease (al-‘alb) in Cairo, Egypt. The research is an outcome of ethnographic fieldwork carried out over 8 months between the years of 2007-2013 in the ‘Arafa (Southern Cemetery) of the “City of the Dead” and is based on participant-observation, structured and unstructured interviews, and in-depth narratives of marad. The “City of the Dead” includes five cemeteries that stretch for miles along the foot of the Muqqattam Hills, first constructed around 642 AD. Its name draws on the layout of privately owned gated tomb structures arranged into conjoined streets that resemble urban enclaves. Tombs center on open courtyards (hwash) with attached rooms. Beneath the courtyards are burial chambers containing the remains of deceased relatives of tomb owners. Today, these cemeteries offer refuge to growing numbers of rural and urban destitute squatters who have been forced out of the formal sector and into the vacant hwash by forces ranging from twentieth century wars and conflicts to economic liberalization and its associated impacts on subsidies for the poor. This ethnographic study of squatters’ communities revealed three interrelated processes. First, individuals emphasized the role of affective states, specifically fear, stress, and sadness, on the blood and vital organs of the body. These were traced to the breakdown or betrayal of family and social bonds under the weight of economic decline and political terror. Second, squatters regarded marad as a form of death-in-life and were especially preoccupied with producing good endings for themselves and their loved ones. Third, corpses and death narratives, which are accessible to this community through funereal work and cemetery habitation, aid this process by opening up spaces for the formation of new moralities about what it means to live and die well among the tombs. This study is significant in its interrogation of the theoretical vocabulary of embodiment and the normative binaries of life and death it upholds. The dissertation diverges from its familiar rendering as subjective “being-in-the-world” (Csordas 2002), to rather become “being-in-between-worlds,” more suitable to an existence in the cemeteries and other contexts where everyday life converges with death.
dc.format.extent235 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectMiddle Eastern studies
dc.subjectAfrican studies
dc.subjectPublic health
dc.subjectcemeteries
dc.subjectCity of the Dead
dc.subjectdeath and dying
dc.subjectEgypt
dc.subjectmedical anthropology
dc.subjectstructural violence
dc.titleBeing-in-Between-Worlds: Illness (Marad), Embodiment, and Social Suffering in Cairo’s City of the Dead
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberRhine, Kathryn
dc.contributor.cmtememberTakeyama, Akiko
dc.contributor.cmtememberObadare, Ebenezer
dc.contributor.cmtememberGerschultz, Jessica
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineAnthropology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
dc.identifier.orcid
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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