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dc.contributor.advisorReiff, Mary Jo C
dc.contributor.authorSladek, Amanda Marie
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-29T19:03:58Z
dc.date.available2018-01-29T19:03:58Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-31
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:15009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/25787
dc.description.abstractThis study examines students’ engagement and meta-awareness of literacy in a modified literacy narrative assignment, the New Literacies Narrative. The traditional literacy narrative (a short autobiographical essay describing the author’s development in reading and writing) is a staple of composition classes but has been critiqued for its tendency to produce formulaic writing and its lack of applicability to other writing contexts. The New Literacies Narrative responds to these critiques by broadening the definition of literacy to include knowledge of a community’s traditions, values, and behavioral norms (drawing on Anne Ruggles Gere, James Paul Gee, and others). Students are allowed to write about their development in reading and writing or in an alternative literacy such as gaming, Greek life, or athletic team membership. This encourages students to question the traditional definition of literacy as the decontextualized skills of reading and writing and to develop a more meta-aware understanding of the cultural and contextual influences of literacy development. The freedom afforded by the New Literacies Narrative can also foster student engagement, as students (especially those who struggle with print-based literacy) can center their narrative on a literacy about which they feel confident. The study covered eleven sections of English 101 (Introduction to Composition) over the course of a semester. Using both textual analysis and computer-assisted linguistic analysis of 111 student essays and 87 written reflections, as well as insights gained through classroom observations and participant interviews, this study demonstrates that the New Literacies Narrative unit led most students to demonstrate a critical meta-awareness of the contextual and cultural influences on literacy. Students also acknowledged the existence of multiple literacies in their written work, interviews, and classroom exchanges. Finally, most students also displayed evidence of their cognitive (intellectual) and affective (emotional) engagement with the assignment and course material.
dc.format.extent193 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectPedagogy
dc.subjectLanguage
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.subjectcomposition
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectlanguage
dc.subjectliteracy
dc.subjectnarrative
dc.subjectNew Literacies
dc.titleRewriting the Formula: Exploring Student Engagement and Meta-Awareness in the “New Literacies Narrative”
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberGrund, Peter J
dc.contributor.cmtememberDevitt, Amy J
dc.contributor.cmtememberLancaster, Sonya J
dc.contributor.cmtememberHallman, Heidi L
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineEnglish
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
dc.identifier.orcid
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1083-7598
dc.rights.accessrightsembargoedAccess


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