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dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorMinai, Utako
dc.contributor.authorGabriele, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T14:38:48Z
dc.date.available2017-02-23T14:38:48Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationConnelly, Patrick, Utako Minai, and Alison Gabriele. “Comprehension of Mimetics by Adult Native Speakers of Japanese.” Working Paper. University of Kansas Department of Linguistics, Volume 37 (2016). pg. 23-41: https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/23231
dc.identifier.citationConnelly, Patrick, Utako Minai, and Alison Gabriele. “Comprehension of Mimetics by Adult Native Speakers of Japanese.” Working Paper. University of Kansas Department of Linguistics, Volume 37 (2016). pg. 23-41: https://doi.org/10.17161/1808.23231
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/23231
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/23231
dc.description.abstractLinguistics traditionally regards the relationship between a word’s sound and its meaning as arbitrary; words which systematically relate sound and meaning – ‘sound-symbolic’ or ‘mimetic’ words – have been regarded as peripheral (Imai and Kita, 2014); however, increasingly, research has found that languages such as Japanese have highly developed and grammatically integrated lexical strata devoted to mimetic words (Hamano, 1998; Tsujimura, 2001, 2005; Tsujimura and Deguchi, 2003). In Japanese, Akita (2010) has posited that among mimetics that denote internal states (‘psychomimes’), three categories can be identified based on semantic, morphosyntactic, and syntactic properties. With respect to syntax, Akita proposes that compatibility with locus noun phrases constitutes a syntactic constraint on these mimetic classes’ naturalness that can serve to discriminate the three classes. In this experiment, we sought to find empirical evidence for this claim by way of native speakers’ judgment of the naturalness of mimetics in sentences according to a five-point scale. Our results provided empirical support for Akita’s claim, indicating that her categorization might indeed be a psychological reality for native speakers of Japanese.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas Department of Linguisticsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKansas Working Papers in Linguistics;volume 37 (2016)
dc.rightsThis work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectLanguage acquisitionen_US
dc.subjectJapanese language-- Semanticsen_US
dc.titleComprehension of mimetics by adult native speakers of Japaneseen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.typeWorking Paper
kusw.kudepartmentLinguisticsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.17161/1808.23231
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.


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This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.  For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.