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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:27:33Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:27:33Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13952
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: A thousand years before electronics, the Japanese already had home security systems. Well, palace security systems like the one at Nijo Castle in Kyoto that was designed to keep the Tokugawa Shogun safe from any murderous ninja wishing to assassinate him. The name of this system is the nightingale floor and its genius is exceeded only by its simplicity: no code to memorize and no keypad to enter it on incorrectly. Here's how it works: the planks in the wooden floor sing when they're stepped on. The singing floor alerted palace personnel to the approach of an intruder. And when I say "sing," I mean "squeak." Do the floors in your house sing? Don't redo them: Rename them. Just tell everyone it's an authentic nightingale floor recommended by shogun for millennia. #hacker #japan #ceas
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0182
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/875284-0182-nightingale-floor
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectNightingale Floor
dc.subjectNijo Castle
dc.subjectKyoto
dc.subjectTokugawa Shogun
dc.subjectShogun
dc.subjectNinja
dc.subjectHome Security System
dc.titleNightingale Floor
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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