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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jie
dc.contributor.authorLai, Yuwen
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-06T14:49:09Z
dc.date.available2007-02-06T14:49:09Z
dc.date.issued2006-01-01
dc.identifier.issn1043-3805
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/1230
dc.description.abstract33 Yuwen Lai The University of Kansas yuwen@ku.edu It has long been noted that phonological patterning is influenced by phonetic factors. But phonologists diverge on whether phonetic motivations take effect in synchronic or diachronic phonology. This article aims to tease apart the two theories by investigating native Mandarin speakers’ applications of two tone sandhi processes to novel words: the phonetically motivated contour reduction 213 21/__T (T 213) and the neutralizing 213 35/__213 whose phonetic motivations are less clear. Twenty Mandarin subjects were asked to produce two monosyllables they heard as disyllabic words. Five groups of disyllabic words were tested: AO-AO (AO=actual occurring morpheme) where the disyllable is also a real word, AO-AO’ where the disyllable is nonoccurring, AO-AG (AG=accidental gap in Mandarin lexicon — legal syllable and tone but non-existent combination), AG-AO, and AG-AG. The first syllable is always 213, and the second syllable has one of the four tones in Mandarin. Results show that speakers apply the phonetically more natural 213 21 sandhi more quickly and with greater accuracy than the 213 35 sandhi. Theoretically, the study supports the direct relevance of phonetics to synchronic phonology by showing that there is a psychological advantage to phonetically natural patterns. Methodologically, it complements existing research paradigms that test the nature of the phonology-phonetics relationship, e.g., the study of phonological acquisition and the artificial language paradigm; when extended to other Chinese dialects, it can also provide insights into the long-standing mystery of how Chinese speakers internalise complicated tone sandhi patterns that sometimes involve opacity, near-neutralization, and syntactic dependency.
dc.format.extent2204350 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas. Linguistics Graduate Student Association
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKansas Working Papers in Linguistics
dc.rightsThis work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleTesting the Role of Phonetic Naturalness in Mandarin Tone Sandhi
dc.typeWorking Paper
kusw.oastatusna
dc.identifier.doi10.17161/KWPL.1808.1230
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-0136-4677
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.  For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.