Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKelton, Paul
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Thomas Edward
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-24T22:13:00Z
dc.date.available2013-08-24T22:13:00Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-31
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:12772
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/11707
dc.description.abstractMy thesis examines whether the over-use of outdated descriptions of Osage Indians contributes to the perpetuation of stereotypes through an examination of the relationship between the historical and anthropological texts and museum exhibits produced between 1960 and 2010. Stereotypes about American Indians in general affect tribes in various ways therefore grouping American Indians together is a stereotype in and of itself. By studying how one tribe has been represented to the general public I am able to see more clearly how such stereotypes are formed and why these beliefs last over time. The time period I chose to study includes a period of social change in the way the Osage have been presented in history, anthropology, and museum studies. I will employ content analysis and coding to examine the data collected from books, articles, and museum exhibits. I will separate the descriptions by field of study in order to determine which field or methods produce well rounded descriptions of the Osage People. The time period between first encounters till the end of the Indian Wars make for popular subjects of writing and research of American Indians. As a result, few studies have been conducted that look at the Osage as members of present society or the impact recent historic events have had on them. I will use my study of Osage representations as a case by which to explore this phenomenon and how over use of historical representations contributes to the stereotyping of the Osage and other American Indian Peoples.
dc.format.extent82 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectNative American studies
dc.subjectMuseum studies
dc.subjectAmerica--history
dc.subjectAmerican Indian
dc.subjectAnthropology
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectMuseums
dc.subjectOsage
dc.titleWho We Were, Is Not Who We Are: Wa.zha.zhe Representations, 1960-2010
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberZogry, Michael
dc.contributor.cmtememberWelsh, Peter
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineGlobal Indigenous Nations Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record