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dc.contributor.advisorFowler, Doreen
dc.contributor.authorLong, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T21:17:34Z
dc.date.available2012-11-26T21:17:34Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-31
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:11985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/10433
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation argues that William Faulkner, drawing on a conversation begun by earlier Southern writers, writes his anxiety about the South's assimilation into the nation. Specifically, I argue that his early works show repulsion to the idea of the South's assimilation, while his later works show more comfort with assimilation, along with a greater willingness to participate in the national imperial project. I begin by establishing the conversation in writers who are active in the postbellum period, and then I explore the ways in which Faulkner draws on this conversation to present his own complicated and changing depiction of nation. Central to this discussion is recognition of an anxiety about the role of the South in the creation of national identity.
dc.format.extent198 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectAfrican literature
dc.subjectCable
dc.subjectChesnutt
dc.subjectFaulkner, William
dc.subjectPage
dc.subjectSouthern
dc.subjectTwain, Mark
dc.titleThe Writing of Nation: Faulkner and the Postbellum South
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberCaminero-Santangelo, Marta
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineEnglish
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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